Category Archives: Perception

Children: Are They a Joy or a Job?

Photo credit: Mother and Child by Kat Ward

photo credit: “Mother and Child” by Kat Ward

I remember taking a college course years ago, during which my very caring but objective professor explained that children have evolved from being assets to investments. “Think about it,” I recall her saying. “In the past, children worked on the family farm or contributed to the overall functioning of the household. Now, we invest in our children. We work to support them. We build our schedules around them, train them, sacrifice our time and resources for them – all in preparation for sending them out into the world, away from the family.” In essence, she was agreeing with Jennifer Senior, an author who recently said in her book, All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood, that “children [have gone] from being our employees to our bosses.” Continue reading

The Power of Gratitude

jameswoodward.wordpress.comUnemployment, mounting bills, concern about the future – with Thanksgiving around the corner, you may be wondering if you have anything to be thankful for. Despite the challenges of living in these tough times, it’s important to remember – you do.

Continue reading

Time Flies… But it Doesn’t Have To

photo credit: workplaceconfidence.com

photo credit: workplaceconfidence.com

When I was young, I had the distinct feeling that time was somehow standing still. Yes, the sun rose and set but the days seemed longer, experiences felt more heightened, and time itself seemed to stretch out so graciously that it was barely noticeable. Now that I’m older and busier, time seems to race by faster than I can measure. Weeks and months go by in a blink. This same phenomenon seems to be true for most people I know, which makes me wonder; if time hasn’t changed (a day has been 24 hours long whether we’ve been nine or forty nine) then why has our perception of time changed as we’ve gotten older?   The short answer is – It may be because we’re not paying attention. Continue reading

Turtles and Hares on the Path of Life

photo credit: journalrecord.com

photo credit: journalrecord.com

There will always be someone with more than you – someone who is better than you are at a skill you’re passionate about, who is better looking, who has more money or “stuff,” who is more successful. It’s also safe to say that when we’re faced with these people who seem to be so much luckier than we are, many of us feel inferior or even gypped. We’re often told not to focus on what we don’t have, and instead to be grateful for the things we do. But I’m inclined to agree with Mark Twain who once said, “Comparison is the death of joy.”

Continue reading

Bad Relatives Make Good Teachers

thegrindstone.comI recently had an opportunity to see “King Lear” at Boscobel’s Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival. As I took in a breathtaking sunset over the cliffs beyond the river – and brother turned against brother; sister murdered sister; and children and their father acted rashly, abusively and cruelly to each other – I considered the fact that Shakespeare’s play is as significant now as it was in his day. From the cases we read about in the news to the injustices we suffer at the hands of our own so-called relatives, it’s appropriate to consider the truism, “You can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family.” The saying, of course, implies an unspoken wish that we could choose our relatives. But I have to wonder, maybe it’s a good thing that we can’t. Continue reading

How to Lasso a Tornado

photo credit: parentspost.com

photo credit: parentspost.com

They say “change is good” and, for the most part, I agree. After all, without a healthy dose of change life would be boring and spiritless. But what happens when the force of change doesn’t knock on the door but, instead,  knocks down your whole house? Continue reading

When Life Hands You Limoni…

B4D9C0FC53C94E8BA211B3CD61DCE633.ashxYears ago I experienced divorce first-hand and it was awful. Emotionally crippling and physically debilitating, I found myself believing that the pain would simply eat me alive as I became a shell of who I used to be. I desperately wanted my “original” self back – to replace my newfound despair with my youthful sense of passion – to recapture my enthusiasm for life. So when I saw the movie “Under the Tuscan Sun,” I found myself living vicariously through Frances, the movie’s protagonist. The plot is simple: Continue reading